Wellington Tunnels Monument. New Zealander Statue

 

Wellington Tunnels Monument Statue Unveiling

Wellington Tunnels monument – The Earth Remembers. A bronze sculpture featuring the outline of a New Zealander wearing a  ‘lemon squeezer’ hat, was unveiled at dawn on 9th April 2017, at Arras. It’s located next to the entrance of  Carrière Wellington Memorial ( Wellington Tunnels Memorial ) in Arras, France. The new Wellington tunnels statue is called “The Earth Remembers”. Wellington tunnels are also known as Wellington Quarry. The ‘dug out’ shape of the New Zealand trooper statue represents a soldier who is “no longer there”. 9th April 2017 is the 100th anniversary of The Battle of Arras when 159,00 British and Commenwealth soldiers lost their lives. 64,000 Scottish soldiers died at The Battle of Arras We took a photo of the new Wellington Tunnels Monument statue at Arras during a temporary media unveiling.   We promised not to publish it online until dawn on 9th April 2017. Wellington tunnels Monument statue called The Earth Remembers. Statue of a New Zealand miner at Carrière Wellington Memorial, Arras. Wellington quarry statue of a New Zealand miner in lemon squeezer hat at Wellington Quarry museum (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) The Carrière Wellington statue commemorates an outstanding secret mining feat. New Zealand miners dug tunnel systems enabling 24,000 allied troops to be hidden from The Germans. The tunnels had electric lighting, and railways to carry  troops to the front line. On 9th April 1917 the tunnel entrances were detonated, and the 24,000 allies burst out into the unsuspecting German lines. New Zealand miners dug a rabbit warren of tunnels under Arras; linking together ancient quarries. This created a secret underground troop shelter. In 2008 a small part of the cave system; called Wellington Quarry; was re-opened as  La Carrière Wellington museum. This secret underground war is only now gaining the recognition it deserves. Wellington Quarry Memorial to The Battle of Arras superimposed with battle flames. Wellington tunnels monument at Wellington Tunnels Museum. Wellington tunnels museum is also know as Wellington Quarry Museum and Carrière Wellington Memorial. Located at Arras France. (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) Exit No 10 Wellington Quarry.  This exit tunnel is open to the public, at Wellington Quarry Museum. Wellinton tunnels; also known as Wellington Quarry were one of the most secret places in military history. They were dug in secret by New Zealand miners. 24,000 British soldiers hid there to launch a surprise attack on the Germans at The Battle of Arras on the 9th April 1917. Photo shows No 10 Exit. (Bill Bagshaw/M. Williams)

Battle of Arras 9th April 1917 100th anniversary

 

Battle of Arras. 9th April 1917. 100th anniversary.

Battle of Arras took place on 9 April 1917. Forty four Scottish battalions and seven Scottish-named Canadian battalions took part in The Battle of Arras. This was the largest number of Scots to have ever fought together. 159,000 British and Commenwealth troops were killed, together with a similar number of German troops. They are all commemorated at The Ring of Remembrance at Notre Dame de Lorette. 64,000 of the British deaths were Scottish. The daily losses were greater than at Passchendaele and the Somme. The Battle of Arras has been referred to as “The most savage infantry battle of World War I”. This brutal battle is only now receiving the recognition it deserves. 60 British  tanks took part in the battle, including MKI  and MKII (training) tanks. British Vickers WWI Machine GunBritish Vickers WWI Machine gun as used at Battle of Arras (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) Scottish troops advance led by a piperScottish soldiers at Battle of Arras 9th April 1917 led by a piper (Bill Bagshaw/M. Williams) Ring of Remembrance Northern FranceSilhouette of soldier at Ring of Remembrance Notre Dame de Lorette Northern France. The ring of Remembrance memorial commemorates 580,000 soldiers of all nationalities killed in Northern France. Bronze panels are engraved with the names of all the soldiers who died on the battlefields of Pas-de-Calais France during WWI. World War 1 was from 1914-1918. Known in France as Anneau de la Mémoire or officially known as Mémorial International Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) The Battle of Arras was one of the main 1st World War offensives by the British Army, and of a similar size to the Battle of the Somme. British artillery bombarded the German lines, churning the ground up so much, that British tanks found it difficult to advance.British WWI tank stuck in trench. Battle of Arras 9th April 1917 (Bill Bagshaw/M. Williams) The offensive used a vast secret network of underground tunnels dug by New Zealand miners. 24,000 Allied soldiers emerged from the tunnels to surprise the Germans.Wellinton tunnels; also known as Wellington Quarry were one of the most secret places in military history. They were dug in secret by New Zealand miners. 24,000 British soldiers hid there to launch a surprise attack on the Germans at The Battle of Arras on the 9th April 1917. Photo shows No 10 Exit. (Bill Bagshaw/M. Williams) Wellinton tunnels; also known as Wellington Quarry; were one of the most secret places in military history. They were dug in secret by New Zealand miners. 24,000 British soldiers hid there to launch a surprise attack on the Germans. The tunnels allowed troops to advance undetected to the German lines; avoiding no mans land. All 24,000 Allied soldiers emerged from the tunnels to surprise the Germans; after a creeping artillery barrage. Photo shows cutaway of 6 inch British shrapnel shell.Cutaway of British 6 inch Artillery Shell loaded with shrapnel. Arras France. (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) The British artillery fired nearly 2.7 million shells. One third (and possibly up to two thirds in some cases) of the shells did not explode. They are still there to this day; together with hand grenades; ready to explode. Unexploded Gas Shells are amongst the most dangerous; as they are now leaking poisonous gas. It’s estimated it will take another 700 years to remove unexploded munitions from France and Belgium. British Tank amongst the ruins of Arras 9th April 1917British World War I tank at The Battle of Arras. 9th April 1917 (Bill Bagshaw/M. Williams) In a coordinated attack; Canadian soldiers captured Vimy ridge; allowing The Allies to advance up to three miles. Photo shows safety signage around DANGEROUS shell craters at Vimy Ridge. It’s very easy for the unwary to wander around in Northern France and find UNMARKED and UNFENCED DANGEROUS shell craters that look like this – DON’T DO IT. They are still full of unexploded munitions. Even innocuous looking fields are just as dangerous. Farmers ploughs sometimes blow up as they till the soil.Safety fencing around DANGEROUS shell craters at Vimy Ridge. It's very easy for the unwary to wander around in Northern France and find unmarked and unfenced DANGEROUS shell craters that look like this - DON'T DO IT. They are still full of unexploded munitions (Bill Bagshaw/M. Williams) By 16th April the Germans reinforced their lines, and the main offensive was called off. The Battle of Arras was considered a British victory; but did little to change the Western Front; as the Germans built new defences. An estimated 300 million unexploded bombs are still buried in Northern France and Belgium. Many of the shells contain lethal poison gas. ( Chlorine, phosphene and mustard gas). The “iron harvest”, refers to nearly 900 tons of unexploded munitions which are ploughed up every year by Belgian and French farmers. The area is still full of unexploded shells; unexploded poisonous gas shells, live grenades, and live ammunition. It’s estimated it will take 700 years to clear the area of unexploded munitions; at the current rate of progress. Arsenic, mercury, lead, acids, & dangerous gases still lie in the ground killing plant life. Since the armistice, over 1,000 people have been killed by weapons and chemicals still remaining in the ground. Bullet Propelled WWI Grenade dug up in a field.     This grenade is still in the barrel of a rusted WWI rifle. The soldier probably died before he could fire it.Bullet Propelled WWI Grenade dug up in a field near Arras. This grenade is still in the barrel of a rusted WWI rifle. The soldier probably died before he could fire it. (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) First World War grenades and gas grenadesFirst World War Grenades and WWI gas grenades (Bill Bagshaw/M. Williams) Saxon Helmet German First World War Saxon Helmet World War 1 German Helmet (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) German WWI  artillery shellsGerman WWI artillery shells (Bill Bagshaw/M. Williams) British Cricket Ball GrenadeBritish WWI Cricket Ball Grenade. (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) WWI Machine GunsWWI Machine Guns and bullets (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) French Lefaucheux WWI Revolver. Compare this to the German WWI Lange P08 (known as a Luger) shown below.  (Bill Bagshaw/M. Williams) German WWI Pistol.   German Lange P08 (known as a Luger) . A recoil operated semi automatic pistol patented by Georg J. Luger in 1898.German WWI Revolver. World War One Lange P08 known as a Luger. A recoiloperated semi automatic pistol patented by Georg J. Luger in 1898. (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) Map of BattlefieldBattlefront Map of The Battle of Arras 9th April 1917. Somme Battlefront (Bill Bagshaw/M. Williams) copyright Bill Bagshaw photography courses

Ring of Remembrance / Anneau de la Memoire

 

Ring of Remembrance. The Anneau de la Mémoire is officially known as Mémorial International Notre-Dame-de-Lorette.

Ring of Remembrance was built to commemorate the Centenary of the Great War. It was opened in November 2014, in Northern France. April 9th 2017 is the hundredth anniversary of The Battle of Arras. The Ring of Memory features the names of all 159,00 British soldiers killed at The Battle of Arras. 64,000 Scottish soldiers were killed at The Battle of Arras. The Battle of Arras was on the same scale as The Battle of The Somme; but is less well known. The Ring of Remembrance is the only WWI memorial to commemorate soldiers of all nationalities. It features the names of all British soldiers killed in Northern France in World War One (1914-1918). The memorial includes the names of soldiers who have no known resting place. 500 sheets of bronzed stainless steel list the names of  579,606 soldiers. Their names are engraved in alphabetical order; representing an open book; or a circle of memory. The Ring of Remembrance; or Anneau de la Mémoire. Located beside the French National War Cemetary at Notre-Dame de Lorette. It is officially known as Mémorial International Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. Ring of Rembrance Notre Dame de Lorette Northern France. L'Anneau de la mémoire is officially known as Mémorial International Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. It rests mainly on the ground symbolising the fragility of Peace. (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) The Ring symbolises the fragility of Peace.  It rests mainly on the ground, with one section suspended in the air. Silhouette of WW1 soldier superimposed on the Ring of Remembrance. Bronze panels are engraved in alphabetical order. The panels list all the soldiers who died on the battlefields of Pas-de-Calais, France, during WWI. Silhouette of soldier at Ring of Remembrance Notre Dame de Lorette Northern France. The ring of Remembrance memorial commemorates 580,000 soldiers of all nationalities killed in Northern France. Bronze panels are engraved with the names of all the soldiers who died on the battlefields of Pas-de-Calais France during WWI. World War 1 was from 1914-1918. Known in France as Anneau de la Mémoire or officially known as Mémorial International Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) All the soldiers names are individually listed, even if they have identical name to other soldiers. The Remembrance Ring or Anneau de la Mémoire is officially known as Mémorial International Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. Built to commemorate the Centenary of the Great War it was opened in November 2014 in Northern France. It is in the only WWI memorial to commemorate soldiers of all nationalities. (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved) Copyright Bill Bagshaw Photography Courses

Aldi Westhill Parking Charge

 

Aldi Westhill Parking Charge. If you park for over 90 minutes at Aldi Westhill you could be in for a £70  “Parking Charge” shock.

Aldi Westhill parking charge notices are mailed  to you if you are parked for more than one and a half hours at their Westhill store.  Aldi; and their agent ParkingEye; are not legally entitled to “fine” you, but mail you a £70 “parking charge” You probably won’t have noticed them but Aldi, Westhill, have numberplate recognition cameras that time you in and out of their car park. Aldi say their parking charges are “to prevent any abuse of our car parks”;  and their signs are “clearly visible.” If you park there for more than 90 minutes, your name and address are obtained (from your number plate); via the DVLA; and you are mailed a £70 “parking charge notice”.  Aldi are obliged to display visible signage to notify you of their charges. £70 excess parking charge at Aldi WesthillCllr. Peter J Argyle, (Aberdeenshire Council, Aboyne, Upper Deeside & Donside Ward) said he visited the store; and did not notice the parking restrictions notices at Aldi Westhill.      Councillor Argyle said:- “As it happens I was back at Aldi yesterday to exchange an item I bought on Tuesday and so spent a moment looking for; and at; the signage. I was a little concerned that the most prominent signs are those attached to lighting columns; right beside the in-car park zebra crossings; as I would have thought motorists should be watching for pedestrians rather than trying to decipher signage with relatively small writing inscribed upon it.” Aldi Westhill parking charge

Abergeldie Castle Royal Deeside

 

Abergeldie Castle moves back from the brink.

Abergeldie Castle riverbank has now been reinforced with thousands of tons of rock. The Castle became famous after being left perched on a cliff edge, during the massive Royal Deeside floods of 30th December 2015. Rocks have been piled high out into the River  Dee to stabilise the Castle, and prevent further erosion.Abergeldie Castle Royal Deeside moves back from the brink after being reinforced with thousands of tons of rock (copyright Bill Bagshaw/M.Williams all rights reserved)