«back to Spotlight

Highland Games Heavy Events

 
 

Swirling kilts as The Heavies put the stone at The Aboyne Highland Games,Royal Deeside,Scotland. dSider online magazine www.dsider.co.uk Photography by Bill Bagshaw photography courses (Bill Bagshaw & Martin Williams/Bill Bagshaw, dsider.co.uk)Braemar Gathering Heavy (Bill Bagshaw www.dsider.co.uk)Weight for distance event at Aboyne Highland Games, Royal Deeside,Scotland dsider www.dsider.co.uk online magazine, Bill Bagshaw photography courses (Bill Bagshaw & Martin Williams/Bill Bagshaw, dsider.co.uk)dsider.co.uk online magazine, photo courses (Bill Bagshaw & Martin Williams/Bill Bagshaw, dsider.co.uk)

Highland Games Heavy Events.

Highland Games Heavy Events are a fore runner of the modern Olympic Games.

Donald Dinnie from Birse, Aboyne was the worlds first sporting superstar due to his Highland Games exploits.

This is a collection of  highland games heavy event photos from Aboyne Highland Games, Ballater Highland Games and  Braemar Gathering. Photography by Bill Bagshaw photography

Highland Games Heavy events include tossing the caber, weight for distance, hammer throwing, putting the stone or ball,  and weight over the bar.

Click here for The Dinnie Stones

 


Putting the stone or ball.     This is where the Olympic event of putting the shot  came from.

Weight for distance. – The competitor  spins around to throw a heavy weight on the end of a  chain. One hand is used to throw the weight and the other arm is used for rotational balance.  The competitor  throws the weight as far as he can.

Throwing the hammer. The hammer is spun around the head several times using both hands and then released. The competitors have long spikes attached to the front of their boots to anchor them to the ground.

Weight over the bar (for height) A weight is thrown upwards over a bar; which is raised up,  to assess the highest height achievable.

Tossing the caber. Competitors balance a long wooden pole on one end then run with it until they are going fast enough to tip it over  end over end.  The caber is thrown for accuracy and not for distance.