Pipe Bands -The Role of The Drum Major in Military Pipe Bands

 

A pipe band Drum Major from The Gordon Highlanders military pipe band at The Aboyne Highland Games. In a military pipe band the Drum Major would be a man of outstanding military character able to control men in battle. The Drum Major was the figurehead of the regiment. In battle he instructed the drummers to play certain beats which passed messages to the rest of the troops. The Drum Major's was a very important job; if he got it wrong the battle could be lost. He carried proud regimental honours on his sash and upon his silver headed mace. In more recent years a drum major in a non military band became more of an entertainer who threw and caught his mace. www.dsider.co.uk online magazine, photo courses Photography by Bill Bagshaw (Bill Bagshaw & Martin Williams/Bill Bagshaw, www.dsider.co.uk)A pipe bands Drum Major from The Gordon Highlanders military pipe band at The Aboyne Highland Games.

© Bill Bagshaw

In a military pipe band the Drum Major would be a man of outstanding military character able to control men in battle.
The Drum Major was the figurehead of the regiment. In battle he instructed the drummers to play certain beats which passed messages to the rest of the troops.

The Drum Major’s was a very important job in the pipe bands. If he got it wrong the battle could be lost. He carried proud regimental honours on his sash and upon his silver headed mace.
Military pipe band drum majors do not throw their mace, however in  more recent years a drum major in a non military band became more of an entertainer who threw and caught his mace.

Click here for Aboyne Highland Games

 

 

 

Glenshee Ski Centre

 
Piste basher at Glenshee Ski Centre. If you have watched red deer in Glenshee bear in mind this is what it looks like in winter. Sunnyside ski slopes can be seen behind one of Glenshees's smaller Kassbohrer piste bashers. Behind the Sunnyside slopes are another 2 valleys of uplift, Meall Odhar and Glas Maol. Piste Basher is the popular European term for a snow groomer. To the right of the photo is the Baddoch chairlift which links the base station to Cairnwell, Carn Aosda and Butcharts ski and board areas. Cairnwell is derived from a gaelic name meaning "hill of bags" (Martin Williams)

Piste basher at Glenshee Ski Centre.  Click here to go to Ski Centres page.
Click here to go to Cairnwell 3 man chairlift     © Bill Bagshaw

Sunnyside ski slopes can be seen behind one of Glenshees’s smaller Kassbohrer piste bashers.

Behind the Sunnyside slopes are another 2 valleys of uplift, Meall Odhar and Glas Maol.

Piste Basher is the popular European term for a snow groomer.

To the right of the photo is the Baddoch chairlift which links the base station to Cairnwell, Carn Aosda and Butcharts ski and board areas.
Cairnwell is derived from a gaelic name meaning “hill of bags”

New Cairnwell 3 man Charlift at GlensheeNew Cairnwell Chairlift at Glenshee (Bill Bagshaw/M. Williams)

 

The Bagpipes -Scotland’s national musical instrument

 

A line of pipers march along, lead by the lead piper of the Lonach Highlanders, which has been described as Scotlands largest private army. www.dsider.co.uk online magazine, photo courses. Photography courses by Bill Bagshaw (Bill Bagshaw & Martin Williams/Bill Bagshaw, www.dsider.co.uk)

Bagpipes are an icon of Scottish culture.

Little is known of bagpipes in Scotland until the 16th century when they became a competitor to the harp.   The Scottish bagpipe really came to prominence when it was adopted by the military in the 19th century.    The great highland bagpipe is the type of bagpipe native to Scotland and has three drones and a chanter.

Bagpipes consist of an air supply in the form of a bag, a chanter, drones and a blowtube.

The bag is an air reservoir which enables the piper to make a continuous sound, and is blown into by the piper through the blowtube.

The chanter is a tube played by covering and uncovering a series of holes, and contains one or more vibrating reeds.

The drones are tubes containing  reeds.

The blowpipe has a non return valve to maintain the air reservoir.

The Great Highland Bagpipe has a bass drone and 2 tenor drones. The chanter is an octave above the 2 tenor drones and two octaves above the bass drone.

 

 

Deeside Railway Line

 
Deeside Railway. Great North Railway Building at Braemar, Royal Deeside. Although this building was built, The Deeside Railway never actually reached Braemar as the proposed route would have been an intrusion on Queen Victoria's privacy. Copyright Bill Bagshaw,www.dsider.co.uk dsider,online magazine, photography courses Royal Deeside (Bill Bagshaw & Martin Williams/Bill Bagshaw, dsider.co.uk)

Deeside Railway Line

Deeside railway line originally ran all, the way from Aberdeen to Ballater 
A small section of the Deeside  line has been rebuilt and work is underway to extend the track into Banchory.       
Originally The Deeside Line was used by Queen Victoria, to get her from Aberdeen to Balmoral.

The Deeside Line closed in 1966 under “The Beeching Axe,” and was dismantled. 
Deeside  Line carriages were sold to farmers; usually to keep their livestock in. 
A few still remain today, rusting away.

Originally it was intended that The Deeside Railway Line would run all the way to Braemar.  
This never came to fruition as it would have invaded Queen Victoria’s privacy at Balmoral Castle.  
The Great North of Scotland Railway building was erected in Braemar, and remains to this day.

Photography by Bill Bagshaw