Posts Tagged: Braemar

Highland Games Heavy Events

 

Swirling kilts as The Heavies put the stone at The Aboyne Highland Games,Royal Deeside,Scotland. dSider online magazine www.dsider.co.uk Photography by Bill Bagshaw photography courses (Bill Bagshaw & Martin Williams/Bill Bagshaw, dsider.co.uk)Braemar Gathering Heavy (Bill Bagshaw www.dsider.co.uk)Weight for distance event at Aboyne Highland Games, Royal Deeside,Scotland dsider www.dsider.co.uk online magazine, Bill Bagshaw photography courses (Bill Bagshaw & Martin Williams/Bill Bagshaw, dsider.co.uk)dsider.co.uk online magazine, photo courses (Bill Bagshaw & Martin Williams/Bill Bagshaw, dsider.co.uk)

Highland Games Heavy Events.

Highland Games Heavy Events are a fore runner of the modern Olympic Games.

Donald Dinnie from Birse, Aboyne was the worlds first sporting superstar due to his Highland Games exploits.

This is a collection of  highland games heavy event photos from Aboyne Highland Games, Ballater Highland Games and  Braemar Gathering. Photography by Bill Bagshaw photography

Highland Games Heavy events include tossing the caber, weight for distance, hammer throwing, putting the stone or ball,  and weight over the bar.

Click here for The Dinnie Stones

 


Putting the stone or ball.     This is where the Olympic event of putting the shot  came from.

Weight for distance. – The competitor  spins around to throw a heavy weight on the end of a  chain. One hand is used to throw the weight and the other arm is used for rotational balance.  The competitor  throws the weight as far as he can.

Throwing the hammer. The hammer is spun around the head several times using both hands and then released. The competitors have long spikes attached to the front of their boots to anchor them to the ground.

Weight over the bar (for height) A weight is thrown upwards over a bar; which is raised up,  to assess the highest height achievable.

Tossing the caber. Competitors balance a long wooden pole on one end then run with it until they are going fast enough to tip it over  end over end.  The caber is thrown for accuracy and not for distance.

Braemar Gathering

 

Braemar Gathering

Braemar Gathering takes place on the first Saturday in September. The Gathering is held at  at The Princess Royal & Duke of  Fife Memorial Park in the centre of Braemar.   The patron of The Games is Her Majesty The Queen whose Scottish residence is nearby Balmoral Castle.   Events start at 9.30 a.m.

The photo shows The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh; arriving in their Bentley; at Braemar Gathering. The Royal couple are accompanied by Prince Charles.

Parking facilities are on the fields on the edge of the village. The grassy banks of The Memorial Park form a great natural vantage point.  You can also buy grandstand tickets in advance (recommended).

You are advised to arrive early to avoid traffic congestion.     If you are coming over Glenshee watch out for red deer.   The best chance of spotting red deer in summer is in the evenings.   Remember if one runs across the road it’s likely to be immediately followed by several others.

Click here for Braemar Gathering Slideshow & More Information

The Queen arrives at Braemar Gathering & Highland GamesScotland, accompanied by Prince Charles & The Duke of Edinburgh (Bill Bagshaw www.dsider.co.uk)

Click here for Braemar Slideshow      Click here for Glenshee Ski Centre

Click here for Ballater Highland Games Slideshow                

Click here for Aboyne Highland Games Slideshow.        Click here for whats on Royal Deeside

Click here for Lonach

Photography by  Bill Bagshaw Photography Courses / Tips

dsider.co.uk online magazine, photo courses (Bill Bagshaw & Martin Williams/Bill Bagshaw, dsider.co.uk)

 

Glenshee Ski Centre

 
Piste basher at Glenshee Ski Centre. If you have watched red deer in Glenshee bear in mind this is what it looks like in winter. Sunnyside ski slopes can be seen behind one of Glenshees's smaller Kassbohrer piste bashers. Behind the Sunnyside slopes are another 2 valleys of uplift, Meall Odhar and Glas Maol. Piste Basher is the popular European term for a snow groomer. To the right of the photo is the Baddoch chairlift which links the base station to Cairnwell, Carn Aosda and Butcharts ski and board areas. Cairnwell is derived from a gaelic name meaning "hill of bags" (Martin Williams)

Piste basher at Glenshee Ski Centre.  Click here to go to Ski Centres page.
Click here to go to Cairnwell 3 man chairlift     © Bill Bagshaw

If you have driven over Glenshee to watch red deer in summer; or to go to The Braemar Gathering & Highland Games; bear in mind this is what it looks like in winter.

Sunnyside ski slopes can be seen behind one of Glenshees’s smaller Kassbohrer piste bashers.

Behind the Sunnyside slopes are another 2 valleys of uplift, Meall Odhar and Glas Maol.

Piste Basher is the popular European term for a snow groomer.

To the right of the photo is the Baddoch chairlift which links the base station to Cairnwell, Carn Aosda and Butcharts ski and board areas.
Cairnwell is derived from a gaelic name meaning “hill of bags”

New Cairnwell 3 man Charlift at GlensheeNew Cairnwell Chairlift at Glenshee (Bill Bagshaw/M. Williams)